Practical Stair Building and Handrailing

Practical Stair Building and Handrailing

About this book

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ... PRACTICAL STAIR BUILDING AND HANDRAILING. STAIR BUILDING. Stairs are a succession of steps leading from one landing to another in a building. Each step comprises tread and riser, the tread being horizontal and the riser vertical. The side pieces supporting the ends of steps are called strings: that next to the wall, the wall string; the other, the front, outside, well, cut, open, or close string. When the steps are narrower one end than the other they are called winders. The landing is a platform between the floors, and it is sometimes arranged to give access to a door. A succession of steps between each landing is called a flight. It is not often that the stair builder is called upon to say how and where the stairs are to go, that being the work of the architect; but the former must do his best to carry out the wishes of the latter, who will leave to him the placing of risers, and all details necessarily belonging to the stair builder, who will make the best possible job, having all easings and falling lines as graceful as it is possible to make them. An easing that is too long is almost as objectionable as one that is too short. He will take the dimensions off on to his rods, and from them set out the whole stairs, showing all doorways, landings, headroom, &c, to 1 inch scale if possible. All winders must be set out full size. u PLATE I. ELEMENTARY PROBLEMS. Fig. 1. Draw a straight line, equal in length to the semicircle ABC. With A and C as centres, and for radius A C, strike the two arcs to intersect each other in S. Join S A and S C extended, to cut the line through B in D and E. Then, D E is the length of the required line, and if this was bent around the semicircle it would reach from A to C. This line throughout this work is...

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