Fighting Germany's Spies

Fighting Germany's Spies

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Book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1918. Excerpt: ... FIGHTING GERMANY'S SPIES CHAPTER I The Inside Story Of The Passport Frauds And The First Glimpse Of Werner Horn WHEN Carl Ruroede, the "genius" of the German passport frauds, came suddenly to earth in the hands of agents of the Department of Justice and unbosomed himself to the United States Assistant District Attorney in New York, he said sadly: "I thought I was going to get an Iron Cross; but what they ought to do is to pin a little tin stove on me." The cold, strong hand of American justice wrung that very human cry from Ruroede, who was the central figure (though far from the most sinister or the most powerful) in this earliest drama of Germany's bad faith with neutral America--a drama that dealt in forgery, blackmail, and lies that revealed in action the motives of greed and jealousy and ambition, and that ended with three diplomats disgraced, one plotter in the penitentiary, and another sent to a watery grave in the Atlantic by a torpedo from a U-boat of the very country he had tried to serve. This is the story: Twenty-five days after the Kaiser touched the button which publicly notified the world that Germany at last had decided that "The Day" had come--to be exact, on August 25, 1914--Ambassador Bernstorff wrote a letter effusively addressed to "My . very honoured Mr. Von Wedell." (Ruroede had not yet appeared on the scene.) The letter* itself was more restrained than the address, but in it Bernstorff condescended to accept tentatively an offer of WedelPs to make a nameless voyage. The voyage was soon made, for on September 24th Wedell left Rotterdam, bearing a letter from the German Consul-General there, asking all German authorities to speed him on his way to Berlin, because he was bearing dispatches to the Foreign Office. Arrived in Berlin, Wedell executed his commission ...

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